Archive for the ‘cool stores’ Category

Girls only telecom store.

21 December 2012

Docomo-omotesando-the-shelf-girls-lounge-19

In an extremely mature retail environment like Japan, retail is less generic and often very niche, specialized or single subject focused. An example of this single subject focused retail is lifestyle or gender orientated stores. One of the most recent cases is from Japanese mobile carrier DoCoMo who has just opened a new communications concept called The Shelf. It is a relaxing environment for young women where technology is being presented as part of people’s everyday lives rather than a (beautiful designed) technology orientated phone store.

Located in the backstreets of Omotesando (Tokyo, Japan) The Shelf has two floors to explore and test the communication technology, books, magazines and make-up. The first floor features four areas surrounding the themes of Travel, Work, Beauty, and Fashion. All the different services and products are curetted by a popular role model who represents one of the themes. They have collaborated in creating a space that shows how the smart phone integrates into everyday’s life for young women. The second floor is the café and lounge to sit down, enjoy tea, read a magazine and check out some make up.

The Shelf is a fascinating idea That is based around understanding lifestyle and need instead of features and models.

via Shift East

No sales person jeans store

1 December 2012

There is a new shopping experience that’s powered by robots and your smartphone. Founded by a former Amazon exec this shop has the potential to revolutionize the way we buy clothes! In the store customers can scan QR codes on jeans they like and robots will send their specific size to a designated dressing room.

The store carrying the name Hointer, located in the University District of Seattle, is still in beta mode and  focuses on high-end jeans for male for now. But the company plans on selling all men’s apparel with various price ranges and eventually expands into the women and teen clothing worlds as well.

Main reason the focus is still men based is the simple fact that shopping is an arduous chore for most guys. They’d rather be efficient with their shopping, and Hointer gives them that with a tech twist. These shoppers are like hunters — that’s where the name “Hointer” comes from.

Why this concept is a glimps in the future? The design of the store requires less floorspace and fewer salespeople, which in turn allows Hointer to offer low prices and carry more stock. And the app allows Hointer to track everything in the store in real-time and lets customers rate clothing. Brands can then access that data via Hointer’s portal to see which apparel people tend to try on and not.

Now it is already so successful Hointer  plans to open more stores in Bellevue, San Francisco and possibly abroad in Tokyo and Shanghai.

Retail concepts and formats that are transforming retail

10 November 2012

If you are interested in Retail innovations. Check out the slideshare of Ebeltoft Group they gave during the World Retail Congress 2012.

In this slideshow presentation they point out nine key innovation themes and show examples of retailers that excel in this theme either through format innovation or business innovation.

Themes are:

  1. Curated Collection
  2. Eco-Friendly
  3. Hyper-Local
  4. On-line/Off line Mash Up
  5. Channel Transformers
  6. Service Experience 2.0
  7. Technology Intervention
  8. Customization/Ask the Crowd
  9. Retailvention

Check also the rest of their presentations here

Pop up store for local (retail) community

18 April 2012

This pop up project had way to less attention while it is quite interesting. It combines so many tendencies that are going on in retail. The most interesting is that it tries to build bridges between communities. Entrepreneurs and creative’s venture in one place and the cities can take notice of their local creative’s and retailers on a great shopping destination.

140 Pop-up Project seems to be a pet project of Cbus, the largest national super fund for Australians in the construction, building and allied industries. This project describes itself best as a temporary pop up community retail project and unites a vibrant collective of artists and independent retailers for 3 months in one of Cbus shopping malls.

The initiative tries to provide the buzzing community of independent retailers and creatives with a unique and interesting platform to showcase their talents and wares in a shopping mall in the center of Perth Australia.

link 140

Japan has the first coffee shop with laser cutter

18 March 2012

Afbeelding

In Japan a new sort of coffee shop is generating a little buzz among designers. The coffee shop named Fab café is an idea of Digital media production company Loftwork to collaborate with a network of designers. The word ‘fab’ means fabulous or fabrication but might also refer to the famous Fablab, a place where you have access to tools for digital fabrication.

The new caffeine hang out will house a state of the art laser cutter, which, for a fee, everyone can use. All you need to bring is an adobe illustrator vector file, which you plug in to the cutter that does the work in paper, felt, acrylic, wood and other materials.

I consider Fab cafe as another great example of a smart collaboration but even more an example of the rise of in-store production. Hopefully this will also stimulate parties like Ponoko or Fab lab to start their own (off-line) retail adventure. For these companies joining forces with a place where a lot of creatives are hanging out can be a smart and easy move to connect with them.

Source Spoon tamago

News Analysis – Online brands are coming to a high street near you | News | Design Week

14 February 2012

click here for the article

Starbucks building up-cycled shipping container store

13 December 2011

Starbucks seems to enter a new stage in their recycle design experiments. In the company’s hometown Seattle the coffee chain is opening its’ first store made of used shipping containers. The containers are actually the discarded ones being used to import tea and coffee.

In the New York Times Starbucks says that the eco-friendly concept may lead to more shipping container stores, but keeps the possibility open that it can also be a one of a kind experiment. The store is drive-up and walk-up only with no space to lounge inside. Just another experiment that makes the brand, that almost felt victim to blandness, interesting again.

via Seattle PI

The past the present and the future of retail

29 November 2011

My stats show me that people are always very interested in predictions of the future. Thinking about the future is significant, but bare in mind that our capability to think about it is limited by our knowledge of today. Disruptions in technology and culture can make a prediction of the near future totally ridiculous or very old fashioned in retrospect.

The Internet is a recent example that changed retail in ways we never expected and not long ago thought impossible. Mobile is already doing the same in a very short time. And if the technology is in some sort of way quite accurate than cultural and social changes makes the prediction almost comical or satiric.

Culture but also economy and politics are the other big driving forces of change that can be so unpredictable. The (spending) power of women, global migration and recently the economical crisis’s are generators or catalyser of change.

I gathered some cool, funny and remarkable examples of predictions about retail from the past. Some are almost spot on, others are falls or completely ridiculous.

Stunning prediction of on line shopping but in the future classic role models are still going strong in household according this short film.

This high tech department store from the 80’s wasn’t promoted because of the  Technophobia in this decade.

“On-line shopping isn’t possible!”  Was one of the opinions back in the 80’s of last century.

News analysis – The Boxpark retail development | News | Design Week

18 November 2011

News analysis – The Boxpark retail development | News | Design Week.

Luxury brands are blurring the line between museum and store

2 October 2011

Photo Getty for Gucci

It is a trend already going on for a few years, retailing brands that are hooking up with art and artist. The need to be more than a brand selling products and the call for a transcendent brand story is often found in art. Especially the luxury brands are dissolving the boundaries between the world of art and their retail activities. They have partnerships with artists and presenting art and products as one of the same. In-store galleries are part of the shopping experience. Their global flagship stores are even of museum architectural allure.  The new Louis Vuitton store in Singapore is one of the newest examples.

To blur the line even more the luxury brands are not only hosting artists like museums but are occupying or even start museums themselves. The most recent example of this is the Gucci museum in Florence. In this museum the product stands central as if it is an uber exclusive window-shopping experience. At the end there is the possibility to buy a piece of all this luxury porn in its own shop. It is just a matter of time that this museum is going to travel around the world and enrich the shopping experience in all Gucci’s flagships.


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